Bowiesongs Extras

Do you think you’ll be remembered in a thousand years?
GETRICHQUICK, SAVANNAH, GEORGIA


BOWIE: No. Absolutely not. A thousand years… My God, can you imagine? Of course, there’s talk of this huge comet explosion in something like 2090. It’s within the next hundred years, anyway. I suppose there’s a possibility that we might still be around in 3000. But think how much software will have been amassed - who would want to sit down and sift through it all?

Bowie answers reader questions for Blender, August 2002.
alternativecandidate:

Star Wars (1977)
“George would sit on the edge of his bed every morning—he had these terrible foot infections. We would sit with him; we didn’t think he would even make it to the set. We walked him around, tried to convince him not to kill himself. He was so disappointed he couldn’t get anything he wanted, the crew was making fun of him. The cameraman was surly, would say, ‘Bring the dawg in, put light on the dawg,’ talking about Chewbacca. George kept saying, ‘I just can’t take this,’ and we kept saying, ‘Come on, George, you can do it, you can get to the set.’ He was really in a very fragile state.”
Writer and producer Gloria Katz on the making of Star Wars from Peter Biskind’s Easy Riders and Raging Bulls

alternativecandidate:

Star Wars (1977)

George would sit on the edge of his bed every morning—he had these terrible foot infections. We would sit with him; we didn’t think he would even make it to the set. We walked him around, tried to convince him not to kill himself. He was so disappointed he couldn’t get anything he wanted, the crew was making fun of him. The cameraman was surly, would say, ‘Bring the dawg in, put light on the dawg,’ talking about Chewbacca. George kept saying, ‘I just can’t take this,’ and we kept saying, ‘Come on, George, you can do it, you can get to the set.’ He was really in a very fragile state.

Writer and producer Gloria Katz on the making of Star Wars from Peter Biskind’s Easy Riders and Raging Bulls

Bowie, letter to Tricky, August 1995 (DB’s letterhead is a nice touch).

As a reader (thanks, Christer from Oslo!) noted, this letter references DB’s bizarre piece of Tricky fan fiction published in Q that year

UNCUT: On “Old Poe”, the author addresses his younger self. If you had a chance to talk to the Lou Reed of 20 or 30 years ago, what would you say?

LOU REED: Bravo!

U: A big round of applause for the guy with the blond hair dye and the Iron Cross shaved on the temple?

LOU: I was young. I was having fun. You’ll never hear me saying, “How come you dye your hair purple or why are you piercing your cheek with a four-inch spike?” That’s what I was doing at that age, because that’s what you do when you’re that age. I love looking at photos of myself from back then. It was something you could get away with if you were a rock star.

These days, you can be on the furthest alternative whatever trajectory and it will be absorbed like purple hair, pins and spikes, and it becomes a business. It’s hilarious when you think about it… people are against something, then they see you can make money out of it. The culture is a massive sponge, a money sponge.

Lou Reed, interviewed by Uncut, 2003.
jonathanbogart:

the60sbazaar:

Joan Baez in court 

With an apparently immortal Aubrey Plaza sitting behind her.

like the idea of a time-traveling, always-unimpressed Aubrey

jonathanbogart:

the60sbazaar:

Joan Baez in court 

With an apparently immortal Aubrey Plaza sitting behind her.

like the idea of a time-traveling, always-unimpressed Aubrey

One day [in 1976] we were in Chateau d’Herouville in France, outside Paris, taking a ping-pong break. Never in my life had I been able to play ping-pong. I never had the coordination—literally, couldn’t play. David said, “Come on, give us a game.” “I can’t, David, I can’t play.”

But I tried it, and suddenly that day I could play, and I’m playing and we were about tied and I said, “You know, man, this is WEIRD, really weird. I always failed at this game and now I can play it.” He said, “Well Jim, it’s probably because you’re feeling better about yourself.”

In the most gentlest way he said that, because usually, you know, nobody wants to be anybody’s teacher or learner—you know what I mean? In the very gentlest way he said that. I just thought that was a nice answer. Three games later I beat him and he never played me again. I got good REAL fast.

Iggy Pop, I Want More, 1982.
the Voice of the Fire?
Anonymous

philsandifer:

I need to reread it, honestly. 

same here. Felt guilty that I preferred Adam Thorpe’s “Ulverton” (same general organizing concept) over “Voice of the Fire.”

but the first chapter of Moore’s book, if you can get into it, is just amazing. took me a few tries.

jonathanbogart:

FOREVER

philsandifer:

philsandifer:

A new update to my actual, like, writing of stuff blog, Philip Sandifer: Writer

Yes, should post this here too. Bank of America has refused to give me my money back. Legal advice needed.